Tag Archives: Derek Rucker

Read This Before Watching Super Bowl Ads

Screen Shot 2020-01-31 at 7.23.16 PMExcuse me, the Big Game.  If you weren’t aware, there are very tight restrictions imposed by the NFL on use of the SB words.

https://www.vox.com/the-goods/2019/1/31/18202037/super-bowl-53-ads-trademark-the-big-game-2019

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But that’s not the point of this post.

You may be one of the many who watch the ads purely for entertainment value.  If that’s the case, you’re no doubt in for your share of brilliance, virtue signaling, emotional manipulation, morally questionable/disgusting, Christopher Walken and just plain bad ads (see “puppybabymonkey”).  All of which is great.  Enjoy.

https://thearmchairmba.com/?s=super

SuperBowlads2016

The intended point is that even if an ad is unbelievably hilarious, poignant, memorable or otherwise highly engaging, advertising has diminished value if the brand is not well integrated.

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It’s sort of like meeting that attractive person at a bar that you have an amazing instant connection with, but leave without a phone number or any other way to take action.  If the brand isn’t connected to the ad, it’s hard for the viewer to do anything about it.

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If you’re a marketer, however, SB, er, BG ads are interesting for different reasons – at $3.5M or $4M whatever the price for 30 seconds is these days, you are no doubt wondering how that expense can possibly pay out.

The good folks at Kellogg Graduate School of Business have come up with a formula called ADPLAN that breaks down key components of effective ads.  You can see how they rate Sunday’s ads in real time here:  https://www.kellogg.northwestern.edu/news-events/super-bowl.aspx

Attention
Distinction
Positioning
Linkage
Amplification
Net Equity

This point we’re talking about is related to one of the 6 points – L – Linkage – – of the advertising to the brand.

Many of the Big Game ads do a great job getting your attention, but don’t close the loop by making the brand an integral element.

As an example, compare two very entertaining ads – – which of them can you connect to a brand?

  • “Just OK is not OK” – whether it’s a tattoo artist, surgeon, babysitter or tax preparer, this campaign is highly entertaining, engaging and amusing. It just doesn’t have a strong linkage to the brand or core message (other than ‘we’re better than OK’ – – not necessarily ownable or particularly compelling). I’ve enjoyed this campaign immensely but have never remembered the advertiser.  (It’s AT&T, by the way.  I checked).

https://www.ispot.tv/ad/IZ6U/at-and-t-wireless-ok-surgeon

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  • “Jake” You can probably already envision the scene (late at night phone call) and catchphrase “Jake…from State Farm”.  In this case, the premise (State Farm is always available) and the brand name are well integrated into the creative.

https://www.ispot.tv/ad/7ISp/state-farm-3-am-savings

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That’s it.  My intended takeaway is neither original nor news – – but it’s still really important in evaluating ad effectiveness.

So enjoy the game this Sunday.  There will be lots of great entertaining spots. And it looks like it could be a good game as well.

However, from a marketing perspective, if you can’t remember the brand whose commercial you just watched, there’s work yet to be done.

Battle of the 2015 Super Bowl Ad Reviewers

It’s time to demonstrate (again) that when it comes to advertising, no one agrees on anything. Raise your hand if you’re shocked.

The Armchair MBA repeated last year’s stunt in comparing the ratings of 10 prominent 2015 Super Bowl ad reviewers, summarized in the handy chart below, along with my personal ratings. (Green/yellow/red coding, alphabetized within my ratings)

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While no Doberhuahua this year, there was plenty of dreck and schmaltz to take its place, but a few very good spots as well. Unfortunately many spots were so-so – – either they rewarded our attention with a muddled message or weak branding, or they were copy-by-committee logical with no heart or pizzazz (Hello, GoDaddy. Hello, Weathertech).

Mostly universally admired: P&G Always “Like a Girl”, Avocados from Mexico, Dove Men+Care, Mophie, Budweiser/Puppy (I declined highest marks on the last two)

Most universally unloved: Nationwide’s “Boy” (runaway loser), Nissan, Lexus

Most schizophrenic (scored best on some lists, worst on others): McDonald’s “Pay with Lovin’”, SquareSpace/Jeff Bridges, Loctite “Positive Feelings”, Toyota Camry/Amy Purdy, Carnival Cruise Lines, Victoria’s Secret (had to watch this again to make sure I knew how I felt)

A few observations:
– Personally not a fan of high-concept feel-good spots like McDonald’s or Coca-Cola or Jeep, or for that matter, the very cute/manipulative Bud puppy ads. Fun for the agency, probably test well for likability, but hard to see how see how it drives action or enhances the core brand equity.
Love spots like Fiat 500 SUV – simple message (we made the base 500 bigger), using an analogy that’s easy to understand and relevant to the main point (if a bit naughty)
– Would love to be a fly on the wall during the approval process of the Nationwide’s “Boy” spot (spoiler alert: it’s about a charming boy who turns out to be dead. More chips & dip, please).
– For fun, check out some of the breathless, we-take-ourselves-kind-of-seriously reviews comments like “Powerful message but tough ad to watch”, “Disturbingly brilliant and impactful”, “emotionally powerful and good storytelling”, blah blah blah – you can see some here (as well as a CMO’s explanation about why his ad was NOT supposed to sell product.  Hmmm…).

To see the summary, click on the chart below. Click twice for maximum size/readability.

SuperBowl2015

The reviewers:
Kellogg Graduate School of Management

Advertising Age

Wall Street Journal
Chicago Tribune


Entertainment Weekly

Variety

Slate

Yahoo Sports

New Yorker
New York Post (new this year!)

My evaluations are generally based on the Kellogg ADPLAN approach: Attention
– Distinction
– Positioning
– Linkage
– Amplification
– Net Equity – – along with some personal gut feel.

We know that the Super Bowl is a special stage, and different rules certainly apply.   In addition, there are social media linkages and previews that can dramatically amplify the impact of ads. So it is somewhat unfair to judge an execution in isolation.

On the other hand, we don’t claim to be fair. And as observed last year, sometimes an ad just sucks.

See you next year.