Little League Whiffs on a Golden Opportunity

For most people in Chicago, and many across the U.S., this year’s Little League World Series rivaled any other sport in excitement and inspiration. This was in no small measure due to a few unexpected subplots.

Yet Little League, with a chance to embrace a unique opportunity to broaden its appeal, missed a golden opportunity in its TV marketing effort.

For those who didn’t follow the LLWS (which ended yesterday), two story lines completely dominated the coverage, and for good reason:

chi-jackie-robinson-west-fans-20140823-004 jrwcoverDJButler

1) A team of kids from Chicago’s South Side, Jackie Robinson West, overcame significant odds to reach (and win!) the U.S. Little League Championship game (falling short in the World title game to a very strong South Korean team). These kids, all African-American, are generally from less privileged backgrounds, yet showed how far a person can go, through preparation, determination, poise and pluck. It was a joy to watch these kids play, and they truly united the city of Chicago across all socioeconomic and demographic strata, a particularly welcome shift from Chicago’s more typical tragic stories of violence.  They are true role models for everyone, not least those for whom organized sports may be less accessible.

Mo'Ne 2) Mo’ne Davis, from Philadelphia’s Taney Dragons team, became the first girl to pitch a complete game shut-out in the LLWS, with pitches over 70 mph. For opposing batters, that would equal a major league pitch of over 90 mph (due to the shorter distance to the plate). Mo’ne’s heroics helped her team to third place overall, and created significant publicity for her, including the cover of Sports Illustrated.  For girls everywhere, Mo’ne is a fantastic role model.

These two stories elevated Little League to a meaningful place in cultural significance, with stories about opportunity, teamwork, dedication and perhaps above all, inclusion.

Unfortunately, during the broadcast Little League, in a continuation of its ‘I am Little League’ campaign, showed a PSA that completely missed an opportunity.  The faces in the otherwise well-done spots were for the most part straight out of Norman Rockwell circa 1950: charming kids but not a person of color, and certainly not a girl, in sight.  (I saw this spot but was unable to locate it online.)   

Here’s a fairly typical PSA from earlier in 2014; based on this past week, ‘I am Little League’ is now quite inaccurate:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zfcTqCj3hqg

In a world where organized sports for kids are increasingly specialized and expensive, there are too few examples of kids participating for the sheer love of the game (as opposed to a stepping stone to a pro career), or examples of girls competing effectively with boys on equal terms.  

This year’s LLWS was a tremendous chance to say “We’re Little League – – we don’t care where you’re from – – if you want to play, we want you!”.

So perhaps this year’s LLWC was two big steps forward, and one back, but at least it’s headed in the right direction.  Now if you’ll excuse me, I need to make plans to attend Chicago’s parade Wednesday for the Jackie Robinson West team.

Why does my phone company want to be my girlfriend?

For that matter, why do an insurance company, car company, and fast feeder also want to be my girlfriend?  (and where were they when I was an undergrad?)

Well, actually, they want to be your girlfriend too.  And I’m talking about long-term girlfriend, not quick little fling girlfriend* (example of that below).

Why?  Quite simply, they want you to like them.  And likeability is very good for a brand.   All else being equal, people would rather do business with a company they like. 

If you’ll work with me on the analogy, these are companies in very competitive, undifferentiated, and more functional than fun businesses.  We’re talking AT&T, Progressive, Toyota and Wendy’s.  They know there are other comparable offerings out there, so they do not want to play hard to get.  They want to be the brand you’re comfortable with and want your parents to meet (if you’re a guy).  If you’re a woman, they’re someone who’d be fun to hang around with.

Here’s a directory of the most prominent of the current ‘girlfriend’ spokespersons.

Girlfriends

Why do these spokespersons work so well?  They’re funny, smart and pretty.  Not beautiful, pretty – – girl next door pretty.  There’s a difference.  Progressive’s Flo, of course, started this recent wave, but all have serious comedy/performing chops.  They are naturally funny, and they’re in on the joke.  All are dressed conservatively, as if to maximize appeal without overt sex appeal.

In short, you like them for all the right reasons.  And if the advertising is successful, some of this likeability/appeal rubs off on the brand and helps you like the company just a little bit more than the competition.

Here are sample clips from each of these spokespersons.  They would seem to appeal to all major genders equally.

Toyota’s Jan (her expression at around :15 is pure comedic genius):

Progressive’s Flo:

AT&T’s Lily Adams:

Wendy’s Red:

These are fun spots, they build the product into the story, they catch your attention, and refreshing the campaign minimizes wearout.  And — they respect the viewer – wow!

So what’s wrong with beautiful?  Well, none of these women is Gisele Bündchen.  (actually if you look closely, Gisele Bündchen isn’t even Gisele Bündchen.  But that’s another story).

The reason:  beautiful just wouldn’t work.  Like it or not, it seems that model-beautiful and funny are virtually never celebrated in the same person (quick – – name a supermodel who cracks you up).   Using someone known primarily for their looks would be distracting, confuse the messaging, and rather than be likable, would make the spokesperson seem unattainable for guys and threatening for women.

*For an example of the exact opposite of the ‘girlfriend’ approach, check out the most recent Carl’s Jr. ad.  Suffice it to say, if you want the Texas BBQ Thickburger, you want it once, so you can tell your friends you had it.  But you would probably not respect yourself in the morning (warning, barely safe for work):   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MvKuhpZjA4M

The Carl’s Jr spot, like most of their work, has it all:  contrived, cynical, pandering, insulting, demeaning.

Likability is good.   I wish more brands tried it.

Mr. Selfridge’s Philosophy is Timeless – And Still Valuable

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Microsoft’s Epic S*** Sandwich RIF Letter

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Elop

We’ve all seen letters/press releases announcing reductions in force  – – usually brief, sometimes using euphemisms – – and many of us have been impacted by them.  Not fun.

We’ve also been schooled that when you have something unpleasant to say (say, in a private performance review), surround it with a positive lead-in and a positive ending – the so-called S*** Sandwich.

We have now seen what happens when a senior executive (seemingly without adult supervision) attempts to use said Sandwich approach on a massive scale, publicly, with consequences that impact an enormous number of people.  And it ain’t pretty.

Yesterday, Stephen Elop, inherited when MS bought Nokia and now running Microsoft’s Devices Group, sent a letter to MS employees announcing a huge reduction in force (12,500 employees).  He drops this bomb after 10 paragraphs of corporate-speak (bread #1), and then devotes all of 2 sentences to huge staff reduction, one of which is reserved to cover the human impact.  He then goes on to describe other steps being taken to achieve the corporate goals (bread #2).

You can read the entire letter below.  By doing a quick scan, you can see that there is a single number in the entire 1000+ word missive:  12,500.  And you can bet that that number is the one takeaway shared by all MS employees.

This letter is not a secret: it is posted on Microsoft’s own site:  http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/news/press/2014/jul14/07-17announcement2.aspx

This has the feel of someone who is trying to sneak in some bad news without the other person noticing: “Hey, how ya doing?  Like the new haircut.  Cool about LeBron coming back to Cleveland.  Sad news about Johnny Winter.  I ran over your dog.  Hey, I think the Cubs can make a comeback in July”.

Anyone who has gone through the trauma of being involuntarily detached from their livelihood knows that it is always shocking and usually devastating.  It needs to be treated with sensitivity, with regard for the dignity of those affected.

It is nice to know that this RIF is in the service of the very detailed strategic corporate goals outlined in Mr. Elop’s letter.

So for those of you who are affected:  my sympathies, both in the event and in the way it has been positioned
To Mr. Elop:  Easy for you to say

Below is the entire text:

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Hello there,

Microsoft’s strategy is focused on productivity and our desire to help people “do more.” As the Microsoft Devices Group, our role is to light up this strategy for people. We are the team creating the hardware that showcases the finest of Microsoft’s digital work and digital life experiences, and we will be the confluence of the best of Microsoft’s applications, operating systems and cloud services.

To align with Microsoft’s strategy, we plan to focus our efforts. Given the wide range of device experiences, we must concentrate on the areas where we can add the most value. The roots of this company and our future are in productivity and helping people get things done. Our fundamental focus – for phones, Surface, for meetings with devices like PPI, Xbox hardware and new areas of innovation — is to build on that strength. While our direction in the majority of our teams is largely unchanging, we have had an opportunity to plan carefully about the alignment of phones within Microsoft as the transferring Nokia team continues with its integration process.

It is particularly important to recognize that the role of phones within Microsoft is different than it was within Nokia. Whereas the hardware business of phones within Nokia was an end unto itself, within Microsoft all our devices are intended to embody the finest of Microsoft’s digital work and digital life experiences, while accruing value to Microsoft’s overall strategy. Our device strategy must reflect Microsoft’s strategy and must be accomplished within an appropriate financial envelope. Therefore, we plan to make some changes.

We will be particularly focused on making the market for Windows Phone. In the near term, we plan to drive Windows Phone volume by targeting the more affordable smartphone segments, which are the fastest growing segments of the market, with Lumia. In addition to the portfolio already planned, we plan to deliver additional lower-cost Lumia devices by shifting select future Nokia X designs and products to Windows Phone devices. We expect to make this shift immediately while continuing to sell and support existing Nokia X products.

To win in the higher price segments, we will focus on delivering great breakthrough products in alignment with major milestones ahead from both the Windows team and the Applications and Services Group. We will ensure that the very best experiences and scenarios from across the company will be showcased on our products. We plan to take advantage of innovation from the Windows team, like Universal Windows Apps, to continue to enrich the Windows application ecosystem. And in the very lowest price ranges, we plan to run our first phones business for maximum efficiency with a smaller team.

We expect these changes to have an impact to our team structure. With our focus, we plan to consolidate the former Smart Devices and Mobile Phones business units into one phone business unit that is responsible for all of our phone efforts. Under the plan, the phone business unit will be led by Jo Harlow with key members from both the Smart Devices and Mobile Phones teams in the management team. This team will be responsible for the success of our Lumia products, the transition of select future Nokia X products to Lumia and for the ongoing operation of the first phone business.

As part of the effort, we plan to select the appropriate business model approach for our sales markets while continuing to offer our products in all markets with a strong focus on maintaining business continuity. We will determine each market approach based on local market dynamics, our ability to profitably deliver local variants, current Lumia momentum and the strategic importance of the market to Microsoft. This will all be balanced with our overall capability to invest.

Our phone engineering efforts are expected to be concentrated in Salo, Finland (for future, high-end Lumia products) and Tampere, Finland (for more affordable devices). We plan to develop the supporting technologies in both locations. We plan to ramp down engineering work in Oulu. While we plan to reduce the engineering in Beijing and San Diego, both sites will continue to have supporting roles, including affordable devices in Beijing and supporting specific US requirements in San Diego. Espoo and Lund are planned to continue to be focused on application software development.

We plan to right-size our manufacturing operations to align to the new strategy and take advantage of integration opportunities. We expect to focus phone production mainly in Hanoi, with some production to continue in Beijing and Dongguan. We plan to shift other Microsoft manufacturing and repair operations to Manaus and Reynosa respectively, and start a phased exit from Komaron, Hungary.

In short, we will focus on driving Lumia volume in the areas where we are already successful today in order to make the market for Windows Phone. With more speed, we will build on our success in the affordable smartphone space with new products offering more differentiation. We’ll focus on acquiring new customers in the markets where Microsoft’s services and products are most concentrated. And, we’ll continue building momentum around applications.

We plan that this would result in an estimated reduction of 12,500 factory direct and professional employees over the next year. These decisions are difficult for the team, and we plan to support departing team members with severance benefits.

More broadly across the Devices team, we will continue our efforts to bring iconic tablets to market in ways that complement our OEM partners, power the next generation of meetings & collaboration devices and thoughtfully expand Windows with new interaction models. With a set of changes already implemented earlier this year in these teams, this means there will be limited change for the Surface, Xbox hardware, PPI/meetings or next generation teams.

We recognize these planned changes are broad and have very difficult implications for many of our team members. We will work to provide as much clarity and information as possible. Today and over the coming weeks leaders across the organization will hold town halls, host information sharing sessions and provide more details on the intranet.

The team transferring from Nokia and the teams that have been part of Microsoft have each experienced a number of remarkable changes these last few years. We operate in a competitive industry that moves rapidly, and change is necessary. As difficult as some of our changes are today, this direction deliberately aligns our work with the cross company efforts that Satya has described in his recent emails. Collectively, the clarity, focus and alignment across the company, and the opportunity to deliver the results of that work into the hands of people, will allow us to increase our success in the future.

Regards,

Stephen

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Jobs Cut

A Non-Techie’s Guide to the Internet Commerce Trade Show (IRCE)

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This year was the 10th anniversary of the Internet Retailer Conference and Exhibition (IRCE) and my first year of attendance.

IRCE logo

Trying to neatly summarize this sort of confab without a experience as an e-commerce operator is sort of like assuming you can translate Portuguese based on having watched the World Cup.  The show was large, chaotic and alien – sort of like walking into 100 Star Wars bars simultaneously.

So while I have decent e-retailing experience, I will not attempt to make sense of all of this.

But I do have some observations.

E-Commerce is based on a few simple objectives, not too different from the marketing funnel used for any other product marketing, but with different terminology:
– gain the right customers’ attention  (‘engagement’, ‘click thru’, ‘open rate’)
– encourage purchase (‘conversion’)
– efficiently delivering (‘fulfillment’, ‘final mile’)
– establish a relationship (‘customer experience’)
– encourage repeat purchase (‘loyalty’, ‘retention’)
– encourage WOM, referrals (‘evangelism’)
– etc.

Simple, no?  I mean, we all shop online, how difficult could it be?

Well, let’s illustrate some of the complexities using a typical grocery store as the template.  Imagine running this store.

This is a store where:
the store itself serves the entire world — yet it needs to be built to serve the right volume of customers profitably
– finding the store requires a guide — yet the description that will lead to your store changes every 6 months
– your most loyal customers can be lost if a competitor offers to carry the groceries to the car for free
one of your big vendors (i.e. ISP) can have a bad day and you are unable to open, with no control
competitors can pop up virtually next door – instantly – and go away just as fast
– about 4 in 10 customers fill up their carts and then exit the store, leaving the cart in the aisle
a person with bad intent could lock the doors of your store –  from thousands of miles away
your loyal shoppers are barraged with promotional messages from stores right next door – and around the world
your competitors’ customers don’t necessarily live nearby – – but you still have to find them
– some of your competitors sell products to an enormous store that’s in every market, and which sells them cheaper (hint: starts with an ‘A’)
– and all of this is changing at light speed — Yikes!

On the other hand, all is not lost.  Imagine if your store could:
remind customers when important events are, and even suggest items to buy for the occasion
– send customers totally personalized communications, including catalogs – – as often as you want, for almost nothing
make recommendations to your customers about what they might love, based on what they’ve already bought
– send customers not just promotions, but at the exact time that you know they typically buy, and the deals that they respond to
enable your customers to tell all their friends about your great store – – instantly, when they’re most excited
follow up every single purchase to make sure everything is ok
dress your store up for the holidays or another event – – instantly
change what your store offers based on what your customers are buying elsewhere
enable customers to order merely by touching the picture in the ad

This is the magic of e-tailing.  The ability to reach and influence is remarkable, and the rules are constantly changing.

Here are a few companies whose products looked interesting:

Ship 2 My ID – – from their website: “Ship2MyID is a social commerce enabler that will allow users to buy items online and send them to others without needing to know the receiver’s physical address. Both the sender and the receiver’s physical addresses are kept hidden from each other, and the receiver has to accept the shipment, ensuring security.”  Got it?  You give them your email or social media ID, they help someone ship something to you without their knowing your address.  yes, me too.

ShipToMyID

 

OrderGroove – encourages all-important loyalty by enabling subscription ordering (i.e. they figure out when you run out of vitamins, diapers, dog treats, whatever, and facilitate having the manufacturer send to you.)

Ordergroove

Bitpay – Still don’t understand bitcoins?  Doesn’t matter.  With these guys, your store can still accept them.

From their site:  “Instant conversion, no transaction fee, and bank deposits in US Dollars, Euros, GBP, CAD and more. We take the bitcoin exchange rate risk, your customers get the best rate on the market, and you get a payment you can count on, every time.”

Sounds pretty low-risk to me.

Bitpay

FeedVisor – Algorithmic Repricing for Amazon Sellers!   I will admit – – not 100% sure what these guys do.  Maybe not even 50%. There was a crowd of intimidating techies crowded around the booth so I just gave them wide berth and moved on.

Algorithmic Repricing

 

The IRCE show is one trade event that is actually worth attending every year, because you know that in a year everything will be completely different.

 

Direct Mail’s Identity Crisis

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We’ve all noticed that as emails have multiplied, the complexion of our snail mail has changed.

It seems that Direct Mail is an industry in dramatic transition.

Not only are marketers more able to individually profile and target consumers, but technology is starting to make it possible to eliminate most junk snail mail altogether.
– Consider PaperKarma, which automatically unsubscribes you from junk mail.
– Or more dramatically, the late, great disrupter Outbox, which went for the whole bundle in working through the USPS to allow consumers to digitize all of their postal mail so that individuals could get rid of junk mail, keep important things organized and never have to go out to their mailbox again. Despite strong market response, the USPS squashed Outbox.  See their very interesting story here.)

And yet, there are plenty of signs that there’s a lot more work to be done.

Consider the following examples:

1) Restoration Hardwareas posted last year, RH again sent its grandiose collection of ‘Source Books’ — only instead of 7 lbs, we got 15 lbs in the form of 12 separate catalogs with over 3000 pages.    We didn’t request this catalog, nor did we buy anything from RH in the last year (nor did we actually open the last shipment).

Restoration1

- The apparent environmental plunder generated predictable outrage, including a clever Tumblr called ‘Deforestation Hardware’.

- Seems like an enormous waste to print and ship.  Yet RH claims that by sending once per year on heavy stock, they actually print fewer pages than many competitors, and encourage online shopping, which is a growing % of their business.  At the same time, the shipping label claims ‘UPS CARBON NEUTRAL SHIPMENT’, whatever that means.  You can find their whole array of disclaimers here.

Personally, I doubt that many consumers keep these things on the coffee table for a month, let alone a year, and the optics are a PR disaster.  It seems more like an ego play by the boss, Gary Friedman.  I’m just glad I didn’t run into my mailman the day he had to deliver these to the neighborhood.

Lesson:  As online shopping continues to morph, the role of ancillary vehicles (like direct mail) will continue to morph as well – – in this case, moving from an immediate revenue-generation prompt to (theoretically) serving as a visual brand reminder, much as broadcast media has traditionally done.

2)  Effective Targeting,  Or Not.   In the same week I received the RH catalog/doorstop, I also received glossy pitches for, in ascending order of preciousness:
a) Audi A8  (starts at $77k; optionable to $120k).  Nice car, but nope.

audia8

b) Around the World by Private Jet (sent by a company called TCS Expeditions and sets you back about $180k per couple for 25 days or so).  Apparently there are lots of these types of tours available; you can save $80k by going as a single!  Nope again.

WorldTravel

c) The jet itself.  Specifically the new Falcon 8X from Dassault.  Yes, I actually got a sales pitch for one of these.  About $58 million.  Nope yet again, even if the garage were bigger.

FalconJet

Somewhere someone has decided that I’m a good target for these extravagances.  I am not, nor is there much in my background to suggest that I am.

So I can’t understand why in this age of micro-targeting, Big Data and 1:1 marketing, that I’m being targeted.

3) DEX.  Like Gene Simmons, the Yellow Pages just won’t go away.  The days where YP was a household staple are long gone; they are now obsolete the second they land with a pathetic thud on your driveway.

Ironically, there is a QR code on the front of the book, which like a snake eating its own tail, leads you to the Dex app (below), as if to hammer home the printed version’s obsolescence.  And in case you needed a further reminder, there is a recycling link to help you dispose of the printed directory you just received.

Dex App

Clearly all of this cannot go on forever.  There are not enough dollars, hours, or trees to sustain this wasteful direct mail.

Lesson: at some point, the ability to get high-quality, appropriately targeted mailings might make a huge difference in an email-cluttered world.  But we’re not there yet.

Top 5 SWEET Treats from the Sweets and Snacks Expo (Part 2)

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Last in a series:  Here are the Top 5 Cool Sweets products I observed at the 2014 Sweets & Snacks Expo. (previously I reported on the Top 5 Snacks, available here.)   As always, all links and photos are active. SweetsShow

Chocolate is the centerpiece of the sweets part of the show.  And certainly by now we’ve seen every possible permutation of chocolate, no?

Shoes

No. Among a few evolving trends:  (thin ‘bark’-like chocolate products and ‘minis’, smaller versions of mainstream products) there were some exciting new products.

Top 5 Sweets Products

1.  Energy chocolate – Awake, Scho-ko-lade, energems

As you may know, chocolate already has some caffeine – about 12mg/oz typically.  These caffeinated chocolates think you need more. Awake has about 66/oz; 101 for a 1.55oz bar.  Scho-ko-lade is a 100 year old German formula that combines the caffeine from chocolate, coffee and the kola nut to deliver 95 grams for 6 sections (about as much as what’s in 8 oz of coffee).  And it comes in a nifty round tin as well.  Energems takes a different approach, calling itself a nutritional supplement and puts 15mg of caffeine in each stylish round candy.

- They all taste great and are an excellent excuse to work chocolate into your breakfast routine.

Awakezutaten_tin
energems

 

2.  Vitamin candy – Supercandy, Vitamingum, Vitamincandy

One thing the world didn’t think it needed is candy that is good for you.  All the company officials I spoke with were quick to mention that these are not supposed to replace sensible eating, but “as long as you’re having candy, why not have some vitamins as well” seems to be the prevailing rationale.  We are one very messed up species. – at any rate, there were some tasty examples.

Supercandy comes in hard, gummy and gum forms and promises B-vitamins, antioxidants and electrolytes.    Vitamincandy comes in 6 flavors and most offer a small dose of Vitamin C.  Vitamingum Fresh offers ‘Fresh Breath and 12 Essential Vitamins’.

- Ultimately, though, if you really feel you need to supplement your diet with vitamins, a pill is probably a more practical delivery system.

store-supercandy-gummy_1 vitamincandy vitamingum

 

3.  High-tech breath mints – EatWhatever

Perhaps inspired by 2-part epoxy resins, the folks at EatWhatever believe in “Two Steps to kissable breath”.  In this case, there are two pills – a gelcap that you swallow after a meal (“especially with smelly garlic or onion”), and while it’s de-funking you from the inside there’s also a mint to suck on for instant hit of date-saving fresh breath.

The mint tasted good (like most mints) but I only tried it once and can’t testify to the effectiveness of the 2-part system.  But they claim it works great – – you will just need to be clever to discreetly deploy this system in a date situation.

eatwhatever

4.  New chocolate shapes – Chocolate Moonshine hand painted artisan fudge bars

Just when you thought there’s nothing new, you run across the booth of the Chocolate Moonshine Company of Pittsburgh.  33 flavors, gorgeous presentation, and absolutely terrific fudge.  A bit pricey at $2/bar, but these are an innovative approach to an old product and are a great indulgence (especially if one of the 33 available flavors matches your team colors), and an even better gift.

ChocMoonshine

5.  MEGA candies – more of what you already get too much of

Finally, the good old American approach of “if I can’t give you something new, I’ll give you more of the old stuff”.

MEGA products are basically pumped up versions of old favorites, with absolutely no nod to nutritional benefits, GMO-free, added vitamins or any of that stuff.  If many of today’s new candy products are sensible like a Camry, these Mega products are 1960s V-8 powered muscle cars.

NY-based Megaload Chocolates sells all sorts of weird combinations that you might dream up on a sugar high:  Oreos sitting on peanut butter cups like the Space Shuttle on a 747, or topped with a chocolate chip cookie.  They may need to create one topped with a little insulin packet.

M&Ms MEGAs are comparatively tame, but prove that size matters in the chocolate world.  Same concept, just 3x the size you’re used to.  And the large size is surprisingly satisfying in your mouth.

MegaloadPic

Megaload Chocolates!

MegaM&Ms

 

 

Honorable mentions

-      Tabasco Chocolate – after chocolate with chiles and bacon, this was inevitable

Tabasco

- Sugarpova candies – yes, this is Maria’s vanity candy.  And she’s got game here too.  Sometimes you just need a good angle.

sugarpova

- Customization (TicTacs) – the only line at the show was for making your very own custom TicTac blend.  Surprised there wasn’t more of this sort of personalization.  There will be.

TicTacPersonalized

 

- Milk Flavoring Pods from JohnnyMoo.  It’s a version of a flavored milk straw that has taken two giant steps forward technologically and now looks a little like your very own Space Needle.  But much better tasting. Fun!

JohnnyMoo

-       Tongue tattoos from Tungtoos – Definitely an innovation I didn’t see coming.  Why, you ask?  Because, as the old punchline goes, we can.

Tungtoos

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