What an Epic Fail Integrated Marketing Campaign Looks Like

Monday’s Wall Street Journal delivered a rather amazing example of how NOT to promote a product, along with the news and pithy commentary.

Most marketers know that messaging can be maximized if deployed consistently across vehicles.  This is apparently more difficult than it seems.

Page A7 of today’s WSJ featured a full-page color ad for €5.99/$7.99 dress shirts, from a manufacturer somewhat oddly named ‘Mosegi & Haberdashery’.

Mosegi Ad 2

It is important to keep in mind that a full-page color ad carries a price tag of $386,865.98.

A cursory scan of the ad shows a few obvious errors:

  • CEO Earl Mosegi’s promise includes: “…will not lose their shirt off there back” (sic)
  • Featured product claim: “Women shirt now available”
  • Key contact called “Sale Representative”

Mosegi_Quote

It gets worse.

  • Ad contains a QR code that is inactive
  • Ad implies a Facebook page (but no URL) which if you find it, not only doesn’t reference the ad, it features products not remotely like a dress shirt. Seems to be targeted at kids.  And it hasn’t been updated since July 2014.

Mosegi_Cartoon

But wait – there’s more!

  • The website itself is remarkably incomplete but also quite entertaining.
    • Of 8 main tabs, only 3 have content. There is no contact info.
    • The all-important ‘ORDER’ page contains just a static image – – there is no ordering mechanism for all the consumers who have seen the ad to take action online!
    • The ad shows a minimum order of 12 shirts; the website lists minimum orders of both 100 and 300 shirts. Clearly this is a wholesaler trying a direct consumer appeal.
    • Most remarkably, an unfortunate keystroke error removed a key letter from the word ‘shirt’, resulting in an entirely new word, which shows up on the home page as well as every single header.

Screen Shot 2014-10-27 at 5.07.52 PM

This brings up a few key questions:

  • Is the entity who placed this ad a) the playboy son of a Turkish billionaire setting up shop online? b) an unemployed Russian hacker? c) a Nigerian scammer? or d) a third-grader?
  • How does an ad that has a bargain-basement pitch, contains so many obvious errors and leads to an online dead-end, get approved by the Journal’s advertising department? (guess: maybe $387k has something to do with it?)
  • Is this our official notification that QR codes are truly dead?
  • Does a re-integrator exist?

Marvin

This is a campaign that seems to have been thrown together with not much thought other than a price point and a photo.

These people really need to get their shirt together.

One thing this ad is excellent at is demonstrating, by omission, some obvious basics of an integrated campaign:

  • Start with a compelling message/offer (arguably they are ok here)
  • Infuse every element of your marketing mix with the same consistent message, offer and look
  • Make it easy for customers to take action
  • For crying out loud, have someone who knows the language check for accuracy.   (The Armchair MBA is particularly pained at this last point, as its companion business, Peregrine Advisors, specializes in helping clients avoid online gaffes).

The Armchair MBA works hard to scour the globe for stories worthy of your attention. This one fell into our lap.

As the saying goes, better lucky than good.

Unexpected game-changers for our future food supply

[NOTE:  If you are getting this post in an email, click on www.thearmchairmba.com to see the accompanying graphics.]

I recently participated in an IFT (Institute of Food Technologists) workshop on the long-term future of our food supply.  These are the same food scientists that midwived the difficult births of Count Chocula, Betty Crocker and Chef Boyardee, but they have also developed fortified, functional and better for you foods and beverages. And they play a critical role in defining our food future. (I previously wrote about IFT’s FutureFood2050 initiative).

chipotle2

Supply Chain as rendered by Chipotle

You may think: How complicated can food be? Haven’t we been farming, shipping, making and eating for quite a while now?

It turns out that managing the food supply to meet future consumer, economic and regulatory needs is about as simple as airline scheduling logistics.

ComplexFoodSystem

Supply Chain – Actual

And as the workshop revealed, it will only get more complicated going forward.  Why?

First, consumer demands continue to increase: lower cost, variety, customization, easier/faster shopping, nutrition, natural, sustainable…and of course great tasting. Not all simultaneously compatible.

Second, farmers, manufacturers and distributors are pressured to meet these needs and still make a profit.

Finally, innovations, often seemingly not food-related, will play a critical role as the food industry evolves.

This future could be very interesting.

Consider these trends /technologies that might impact the future of food, all of which are happening now:

- Farm drones/robots/blimps – – to monitor crop conditions continuously, greatly increasing farming efficiencydrone-corn720x540

- Resource-sharing – – rather than time-sharing a car, how about meat-sharing a cow?   More accurately matching supply to demand.

CowShare

- Crowdsourcing product design - – leading to higher success rate of new products

CrowdSourceFood

- Versatile manufacturing – – economical short production runs, allowing more customization

- Urban farming – – new technologies enable repurposing declining urban areas (Detroit-like)

VerticalFarming

- Automated delivery – – driverless delivery to homes (drones, copters) – taking cost and time out of supply chains

- Rise of B Corporations – – (“a new type of company that uses the power of business to solve social and environmental problems.”) Transparency in social benefit, an additional differentiator.

B-Corp

- Shorter IP protection – – forcing faster innovation and creating increased competition

- Remote smell – – transmitting tastes/smells through the internet, making product development quicker and more successful. (Were this previously available, we may have been able to avoid Brussels sprouts.)

o-phone-smell-text-message-designboom03-300x200

oPhone

- Genetic consumer cohorts – – low-cost genetic typing enables segmenting consumers by health-driven factors like allergies, facilitating meeting needs of key segments.

DNA

- Expanded definition of acceptable food – – e.g. ground insects as source for cheap, high efficiency protein, creating an affordable ingredient for billions, and one heck of a marketing challenge for some.

Jiminy

What does all this mean?
Well, we don’t know yet.  That’s why they call it the future.

One set of outcomes could be:

  • Greater ability for consumers to quickly get foods customized to their wants/needs
  • More tools for farmers, manufacturers, retailers and distributors to drive down costs

A parallel set of outcomes could also be:

  • Benefits limited to those who can afford customization and speed (and the tools that enable them)
  • A more commoditized supply chain complementing the customized offerings, with lower cost, slower delivery and less choice – – for those who cannot afford (or just do not value) the more tech-enabled offerings

There would likely be huge collateral impacts, like increased complexity in regulation, labeling and distribution; new retailing models, etc.

Like it or not, food science and technology professionals will need to be prepared to meet these potential future challenges.

The rate of change in the food industry is accelerating.  I’m all for it, as long as there’s still bacon.

…and Botswana makes it 100 Countries!

In a shameless act of self-promotion, this announces that as of today, The Armchair MBA has now reached 100 countries served!    A sort of crazy milestone considering its quite humble and uninformed beginnings, some 70 posts and 2 1/2 years ago.

100 Countries

 

But beyond cocktail party braggadocio, what does this say about the state of blogging?  Or, who cares?

First, some info.
Below is a map of where my readers have come from. Darker colors indicate more readers.
– Clearly a bias toward English-speaking countries but plenty from elsewhere.
– While the US is by far the strongest reader source, average daily readership comprises about 5 or 6 countries, which shift daily.
– Notable in their presence:  China (a single rogue reader!), Botswana (which got me over the 100 hump today) and Papua New Guinea (only because I can’t not think about the combination of loincloths and laptops).
– Totally expected absences:  Cuba, Russian satellites, Iran, N. Korea, and most of Africa.  Is there media repression?  Of course.

While I have a strong base of followers (thank you!), most readership is not subscribed and comes from 2 sources:  LinkedIn (on one page or another) and online search results.  The latter group accounts for the majority of non-English country visitors.

Screen Shot 2014-10-09 at 3.14.30 PM

 Lessons learned?
– The global pull of The Armchair MBA has been surprising.  Part of the reason is that topics often have global relevance; one more support point for the theory that borders are increasingly irrelevant as it relates to business news/learning/sharing.
Posts have long tails – – there is a bump in initial readership but even the oldest posts get recurring views.  The internet is a great accumulator.   Full disclosure:  I recently experimented by taking a SEO approach and including all African nations in text form — it has resulted in some visits from Africa, but to the point below, it is slow.  But it is possible to proactively solicit traffic.
Propagation is steady but slow – – but even if initial readership is modest, much value is still retained as a post transitions from ‘news’ to ‘reference’TAMBA-credential
Having a blog like this pays nothing, but it does have its benefits:
Provides an outlet for my voice and is encouragement to continue to explore, think and opine
– Occasionally merits a media credential, enabling privileged access to trade shows/seminars and continued learning for myself and for my clients
Solicits feedback and additional points of view, often from some surprising sources
– And, every once in a blue moon, provides validation in the form of a ‘Like’.  Sort of like Facebook, only with much more work (including checking my sources).

Thanks for reading.  And thank you, Botswana.

 

We Tested it On You, So It’s Probably OK for Your Pet

I had the pleasure of attending a brand new trade show – Petfood 2.0 - in Chicago recently.

Petfood2.0logo

Not surprisingly, this show is still getting its furry legs under it – – a very manageable group of 35 disparate exhibitors made for a quick and interesting, if not yet cohesive, experience.

Overall, though, a larger theme presented itself:
Following thousands of years of dogs serving man, the tables have turned.
Man now serves dog.

Exhibit 1:  Hemp for Pets.

Now available from our friends at HempMeds, is a line of products made from hemp to benefit your pets.  aNew™ Pet Nutrition‘s products provide essential fatty acids (EFA – – Omega-3 and -6) and are made from a blend of hemp seed oil and raw hemp stalk oil (which is rich in cannabidiol – CBD).  EFAs, as we know, are highly beneficial – – just don’t ask the industry to agree on what the top benefits are.

pet_oil250

This innovation in pet health could not have been possible without the committed testing of hemp products by millions of Americans in the 1960s and 1970s.  So while the outcome of all that testing is up for discussion, your cat or dog is possibly benefiting now from what you did in college then.

OK, that’s not accurate.

While hemp is illegal to grow in the US, it is perfectly legal to import any part of the hemp plant in all 50 states.
And while the prospect of Fifi or Rover lying on his or her back contemplating the ceiling tiles for hours on end and giggling is intriguing, these products contain virtually no THC – the active ingredient that makes marijuana psychoactive.

Although it would be interesting to see if Nigel would behave any differently with the munchies.  Doubtful.

Hempmeds

Exhibit 2:   Functional ingredients for pets – – it worked on Man, so it’s probably safe for Rover.

We long ago realized that we could do better than feeding our pets Ol’ Roy (WalMart).  Thus emerged added value feed (e.g. Iams, Eukanuba, Science Diet, etc), offering different formulas for large breeds, older pets, etc. as well as some medical needs.

Meanwhile, human foods and beverages have increasingly been stuffed with a dizzying array of functional ingredients, many of which have no empirical basis in efficacy.  But we humans have shown that we’re willing to buy them anyway.  What did Charles Revson say about hope?

Based on this massively-scaled test market on mankind, it apparently has been deemed that animal-kind is now ready to safely ingest all sorts of functional ingredients that may or may not actually ever benefit them.

Petfood2.0

Incorporating things like ancient grains, fiber, medium-chain triglycerides, probiotics and ionic trace minerals, your pet can now get benefits heretofore only considered for the human species (notwithstanding hairballs and a healthy coat).

One company, PetNaturals of Vermont, offers products to address the following areas:
– Agility, Antioxidant, Bladder Support, Breath, Calming, Daily Multivitamin, Digestion, Hip & Joint, Immunity, Slim-down, Urine pH balance (really – to avoid yellow spots on the lawn), Periodontal health, Fecal function, and Skin/Coat health.

You dog and cat owners will probably recognize some of the benefit areas in the products below.

photo 1

We live in a world where the things we eat promise magical powers to fix whatever marketers insist needs fixing.  And regardless of the effectiveness, manufacturers have made a tidy business catering to hope.

Now, due to the significant sacrifice, expense and effort expended in testing on humans, our pets will soon be able to have their diets enhanced, and your wallet may end up just a little lighter.  So when your pet looks up as if to say ‘Thanks, Man’, now you know what’s going through that little brain.

I have no doubt that many of these ingredients can provide real benefits to some of the 150 million dogs and cats out there.

Except I’m not believing anything that promises intelligence to an Irish Setter.

Captex

Comcast Hacks its Own Email Service! On Purpose! Really!

UPDATE TO THIS POST – – SOLUTION FOUND!  and not from Comcast.

A helpful reader sent me the following recommendation, pasted below in its poetic entirety.

go here: http://xfinity.comcast.net/adinformation/
sign-in
Opt Out
Turn Off

Done and done! So easy…stop bitchin’!

———————————————————-

He was right – – it did work, very quickly.  Why couldn’t Comcast send this solution?

Original post  (below):

———————————————————-

How does Comcast spell customer?        Apparently, ‘H-O-S-T-A-G-E’.

In a bizarre marketing gambit to generate revenue through its Xfinity email service, Comcast has not only demonstrated that it values advertisers over customers, it has shown that it has mistaken customer captivity for loyalty.

When you have customers in a market where there are available alternatives, you need to do 2 things: a) keep them happy with superior service; and b) try to avoid giving them a reason to switch.

Here’s what I recently experienced:

SmallXfinityAdLargeXfinityAd

  • Without warning, a square advertising banner appeared on the upper left of my screen, covering key email commands (select, delete, refresh, etc). Comcast thus made it impossible to use its own email.  This ad never went away.
  • A mouse-over converted this box into a larger, even more annoying video ad, in effect acting as a palace guard, to ensure that customers couldn’t even try to get to the controls and read their emails.   Footprint of ads shown below.

XfinityOverlap

  • Disabling this ‘feature’ required an email to Comcast, and resulted in a 6-step, byzantine preferences-changing process that ‘may take up to 30 days to take effect’ (see below). What? Complicated process + 30 days to opt out?  Do you want me to switch?

comcast note

 

- Comcast calls this program ‘Segmented Advertising’, and provides an explanation that it tailors ads to based on customers’ preferences. (Not exactly a new concept, but what if our preference is to just get our email?)

ComcastSegmented

The upside-down-ness of this program is hard to believe, and is proof that at Comcast there is some kind of crazy monkey at the steering wheel.

A hacker working for a competitor would be hard-pressed to create a more annoying disruption for Comcast users – and they’ve done it for themselves.

Let’s break this down:

  • The ONLY reason anyone visits an email page is to use email
  • Disrupting email utility therefore eliminates the reason to use Xfinity email
  • An opt-out approach FORCES ALL CUSTOMERS through the exercise of disabling (creating ill will), and forces customers to immediately try out an alternative (Apple Mail and gmail for me).
  • Taking up to 30 days to take effect provides a great trial period for competitive email services
  • And to complete the cycle, fewer users of Xfinity email of course reduces reach and effectiveness of the offending ads

I’ve blacklisted the companies whose ads continuously and annoyingly popped up. For the record, they are:

  • Blain’s Farm & Fleet
  • Walter E Smithe Furniture
  • Howard Jewelry and Loan – The Pawn that Pays
  • Grossinger Auto Dealers
  • McGrath Audi of Glenview/McGrath Acura of Morton Grove
  • Golf Mill Ford
  • Evanston Subaru in Skokie
  • Highland Park Ford Lincoln Superstore
  • Peter Francis Geraci – bankruptcy attorneys
  • Luna Carpets
  • Ambiance Window Fashions

Since I’m not in the market for a car, home furnishings, farm equipment, bankruptcy help or pawn services, I will survive.

Finally, I’m writing this post/rant to share my experience (I was perfectly happy a week ago, mind you) and hope you share it with someone you love.  Especially if they work for Xfinity.

Again, the lesson, said a little differently:  in a world with ready options, don’t piss off your customers.

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For those who are interested, below are screen shots of the process required to eliminate these ads (which hasn’t taken effect for me yet).

OptOut1 2 OptOut3 4 OptOut5 OptOut6

Shoes, Elephants and Michelangelo

A famous and probably apocryphal story relates how in the late 1800s, shoe companies sent scouts to Africa to assess opportunity. All came back and said: “no one in Africa wears shoes – – there is no opportunity” – except for the rep for Bata, who said: “everyone in Africa is barefoot – – there’s a huge opportunity”. Bata shoes are now ubiquitous in Africa.

Bata1

With its vast population, diversity and resources, why aren’t more companies committed to growth from Africa? Why do EMEA business strategies have no patience for the ‘A’? Certainly with that many people, shouldn’t African commerce, like life in Jeff Goldblum’s Jurassic Park quote, “find a way?”

The challenge is daunting, and figuring this one out is above my pay grade, but thinking about solving for Africa can make just about any other challenge seem pretty straightforward.

africa

There are of course very real reasons that Africa is challenging. A Sept 16 scan of Google News stories across 54 African nations (below), reveals overwhelming existential crises such as Ebola, terrorism, sectarian violence, mixed in with a standard dose of President-for-life type scandal (see: Mugabe, Robert), but not many commercial or consumer focused stories. Where much of the developed world has surplus calories, Africa has a basic food (and water) deficit. A quick look at per-capita incomes shows that African citizens are among the poorest in the world. Barriers, indeed.

Yet we are all still more alike than we are different. We all have needs: food, shelter, entertainment, and yes, shoes.  And so within a mass of challenges, there are opportunities.  Bata figured this out long ago – – it saw millions of bare feet, rather than cultural or economic barriers, and methodically penetrated the continent.

The key, as in eating an elephant, is to take it one bite at a time.  In fact, it’s really just another execution of basic marketing – identifying segments, understanding their needs and barriers, and creatively and selectively applying solutions.  Pricing? Access? Promotion? Distribution? Positioning? Unique benefits?  A solution is almost always available – it’s just not always obvious.EatingAnElephant Unlocking this potential may be gaining traction: PricewaterhouseCoopers’s Africa Business Agenda 2014 report was released last week.  The report, comprising surveys and interviews with 260 chief executives in 14 African countries, indicates that CEOs are optimistic about growth despite volatility and uncertainty on the continent.  From Business Report/Africa: “The Chief Executives acknowledge that a lot more needs to be done in terms of transforming the continent’s potential for exponential growth into tangible business opportunities”. There are examples where creative and focused approaches helped realize growth from similarly unlikely places.

  • In India, Colgate has carved out over 55% of the oral care market (~$600 million+) despite toothpaste penetration of only 55% (and only 15% of them brush twice daily), and a per-capita income ranked 120 of 164 countries in 2013 (World Bank).
    • This was done by offering more affordable sizes, and innovating a multi-layer distribution system to penetrate the largely rural population
  • In Mexico, concrete giant Cemex, through its Patrimonio Hoy (‘Private Property Today’) program, has enabled many low-income families to build onto their homes on an installment plan at affordable levels.
    • For example, in this innovative program, one family pays $18 per month for $960 in construction materials, allowing them to add stepwise onto their home.

Whether it is Africa, India or a mass of consumers (or customers) at home, the same principles apply.  Where there is need, solutions are always possible.

Michelangelo

As Michelangelo said: “Every block of stone has a statue inside it and it is the task of the sculptor to discover it”.

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A Day In The Life of Africa – September 16, 2014

Country                                              Story 1                                        Story 2
Algeria                                                al Qaeda                                        Soccer
Angola                                                Sub-Saharan investment             Oil Exploration
Benin                                                  Ebola                                             Trade
Botswana                                           Crackdown on press                     Ebola
Burkina Faso                                      Soccer                                          Trade
Burundi                                              3 nuns murdered                             —
Cameroon                                          Soccer                                            —
Cape Verde                                        Soccer                                         Tropical storm
Central African Republic                 Muslim-Christian violence              —
Chad                                                  Guys named Chad                         —
Comoros                                            Islamic oil deal                   Indian Ocean Comm.
Dem. Rep. of the Congo                    Ebola                                          Mineral dev.
Djibouti                                               al Qaeda                                     Violence
Egypt                                                Fighting Islam                          Muslim B’hood exiles
Equatorial Guinea                           UN Ambass. accused          Call for national unity
Eritrea                                             Leather export trade                   US travel warning
Ethiopia                                           Relations with Egypt                   Egypt opposition
Gabon                                                Soccer                                            —
Gambia                                              Anti-gay legislation                       Ebola
Ghana                                                Ebola                                           Soccer
Guinea                                               Corruption                                    Ebola
Guinea-Bissau                                   Ebola                                           Political instability
Ivory Coast                                        Soccer                                             —
Kenya                                                Cost of living                          Investment/trade
Lesotho                                             Coup attempt                                   —
Liberia                                               Ebola                                                —
Libya                                                 Migrant boat capsizes                    Islamic terrorists
Madagascar                                      Lemurs                                            Locust infestation
Malawi                                               Political scandal                              Soccer
Mali                                                    al Qaeda                                          Sectarian violence
Mauritania                                          Moving weekend to Fri/Sat              Business/trade
Mauritius                                            Foreign investment                          Murder invest.
Morocco                                            Anti-racism demonstrations                —
Mozambique                                      Elephant poaching                           Political rivals
Namibia                                              Foreign trade                                    —
Niger                                                  US drone base                                 Baby trafficking
Nigeria                                               Building collapse                              Ebola
Rep. of the Congo                           Ebola                                              Political corruption
Rwanda                                             Genocide 20th anniv.                Rebuilding efforts
São Tomé and Príncipe                     Infrastructure dev.              New: cellular roaming
Senegal                                             Ebola                                               Soccer
Seychelles                                         Tourism                                            Protected species
Sierra Leone                                      Ebola                                                —
Somalia                                              anti-al Qaeda/ISIS                           anti-Shebab
South Africa                                       Pistorius trial                                    Rugby
South Sudan                                      Foreign aid worker ban            Internal peace
Sudan                                                Condemned Christ. woman         Peace with S. Sudan
Swaziland                                          UK power investment           Royal family antics
Tanzania                                            Foreign investment                       Infrastructure
Togo                                                  Qatar investment                          Soccer
Tunisia                                               Economic pressure                         Security
Uganda                                              Foiled terrorist attack               US warns Americans
Zambia                                              Political leader dies                          Soccer
Zimbabwe                                         $3B mining deal w/Russia                  —

The Loyalty Program That Will Survive the Apocalpyse – – and Why

The future of shopping and loyalty is mobile – – we are continually reminded about this.  Digital loyalty programs can leverage vast storehouses of data and sophisticated analytics, and can deliver individualized promotions at a time, place and shopping occasion that optimizes ROI.

JewelOscoPromoSo why the heck is there, sitting on my kitchen counter, a sheet for gluing small stamps received with each shopping trip at the local Jewel (Albertson’s)?  (If enough stamps are collected, a piece of Cuisinart cookware can be ours!).  

After all, this is an utterly low-tech, old media, one-size-fits-all loyalty promotion here in the digital age.

Ultimately the reasons for this low-tech promotion’s survival are related to its low-techness, and can be helpful to more tech-driven modern programs.

S&H GreenStamps

SinclairS&H_greenstamps

Hard to believe but this is essentially the same concept as S&H Green Stamps, which debuted over 100 years ago and were highly popular from the 1930s to the 1980s.  You got stamps when you bought stuff, filled out books (typically 1200 stamps) and could then win prizes from a catalog.  Stores that gave out these stamps used it as a competitive advantage.

And this is not an isolated grocery type program – – McDonald’s famously runs its Monopoly program, where customers get game pieces on everything they buy, and can win big prizes if they collect the right stamps.

mcdonalds-monopoly2013-300x300McDonalds_monopoly_pieces

 So what accounts for these games’ popularity? 

1) Simplicity – no apps, no logging on or passwords, no points to track online, no devices at all.  Just shop, stick, rinse and repeat.  It’s likely that there is greater appeal among older users for some of these promotions, but that doesn’t explain the McDonald’s popularity.

2) Can visualize success – each new stamp makes progress tangible and encourages continued participation

3) User involvement – Unlike an automatic electronic promotion, manually applying the stamps actively involves the participant, much like adding the proverbial egg to the cake mix turned Mom into a baker – increasing personal commitment level.

4) Closed-ended – a finite promotion period, so no long-term commitment or long wait for a payoff

5) It’s fun! – there’s an excitement to participating in these promotions!  It’s not just a mercenary exercise in repetitive purchases; there’s often an element of chance (and like gambling and golf, hope is what brings people back in the face of continued abject failure).

I’ve not seen any statistics about whether any of these promotions is more effective at driving shopper loyalty than any other.  I know that stamp programs definitely impact our shopping habits at home.

In any case, it’s clear that digital/mobile is the future of loyalty programs, even if the transition will take some time.

But some of the factors that make these old-school promotions popular can help make future loyalty efforts more successful.  

And until tech can replicate all of the above factors, it’s likely we’ll be shopping, sticking and winning, well into the future.

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